Behold the Man

‘Behold The Man’ was a self initiated 3 year social photographic documentary. The project and exhibition was an exploration of mind, body and soul through a three-year collaborative study with Alan Dainton, a homeless beggar in Cheltenham battling addiction.

The project resulted in to major exhibitions at The Wilson Gallery and the H Club in London. Three large portraits of Alan were displayed as a triptych, with a supporting video that documented Alan’s journey. Visitors were invited to contemplate three images of Alan, each representing a different state of mind. They then had an opportunity to help Alan and others in similar situations by purchasing the supporting book, posters and postcards. The money spent was exchanged for the equivalent in gold plastic coins which were then used to vote on charitable options. Giving the money to:

Sustenation: Directly to Alan.
Intervention: One years rehabilitation for Alan or someone similar.
Prevention: Projects concerned with youth at risk or in recovery from drugs and alcohol.

The project received generous donations from the public while increasing awareness and interest around the topic of homelessness and addiction. Votes in the coin drop were overwhelmingly in favour of ‘Prevention’. This money was therefore donated to the local YMCA.

The book contains the thesis for the project as well as latest Home office figures on drugs and homelessness in the UK. The back page is embossed with Alan’s signature and cover unfolds to become a poster.

The high production values of the book deliberately juxtapose the subject. The aim is to make readers feel slightly uncomfortable that so much effort has been devoted to what most people would deem a hopeless case of addiction and disregard for society. The overarching idea for the book was to make something beautiful and significant out of the dirt and chaos of Alan’s world.

Two weeks after the exhibition, Alan decided to stay off Heroin and is now in sheltered accommodation in the Cheltenham YMCA. He is working on a recovery programme.

The high production values of the book deliberately juxtapose the subject. The aim is to make readers feel slightly uncomfortable that so much effort has been devoted to what most people would deem a hopeless case of addiction and disregard for society. The overarching idea for the book was to make something beautiful and significant out of the dirt and chaos of Alan’s world.

Two weeks after the exhibition, Alan decided to stay off Heroin and is now in sheltered accommodation in the Cheltenham YMCA. He is working on a recovery programme.

Alan Dainton – “If this project just helps one kid stay off drugs, it would still have been worth it.”

Behold the Man

‘Behold The Man’ was a self initiated 3 year social photographic documentary. The project and exhibition was an exploration of mind, body and soul through a three-year collaborative study with Alan Dainton, a homeless beggar in Cheltenham battling addiction.

The project resulted in to major exhibitions at The Wilson Gallery and the H Club in London. Three large portraits of Alan were displayed as a triptych, with a supporting video that documented Alan’s journey. Visitors were invited to contemplate three images of Alan, each representing a different state of mind. They then had an opportunity to help Alan and others in similar situations by purchasing the supporting book, posters and postcards. The money spent was exchanged for the equivalent in gold plastic coins which were then used to vote on charitable options. Giving the money to:

Sustenation: Directly to Alan.
Intervention: One years rehabilitation for Alan or someone similar.
Prevention: Projects concerned with youth at risk or in recovery from drugs and alcohol.

The project received generous donations from the public while increasing awareness and interest around the topic of homelessness and addiction. Votes in the coin drop were overwhelmingly in favour of ‘Prevention’. This money was therefore donated to the local YMCA.

The book contains the thesis for the project as well as latest Home office figures on drugs and homelessness in the UK. The back page is embossed with Alan’s signature and cover unfolds to become a poster.

The high production values of the book deliberately juxtapose the subject. The aim is to make readers feel slightly uncomfortable that so much effort has been devoted to what most people would deem a hopeless case of addiction and disregard for society. The overarching idea for the book was to make something beautiful and significant out of the dirt and chaos of Alan’s world.

Two weeks after the exhibition, Alan decided to stay off Heroin and is now in sheltered accommodation in the Cheltenham YMCA. He is working on a recovery programme.

The high production values of the book deliberately juxtapose the subject. The aim is to make readers feel slightly uncomfortable that so much effort has been devoted to what most people would deem a hopeless case of addiction and disregard for society. The overarching idea for the book was to make something beautiful and significant out of the dirt and chaos of Alan’s world.

Two weeks after the exhibition, Alan decided to stay off Heroin and is now in sheltered accommodation in the Cheltenham YMCA. He is working on a recovery programme.

Alan Dainton – “If this project just helps one kid stay off drugs, it would still have been worth it.”

Behold the Man

‘Behold The Man’ was a self initiated 3 year social photographic documentary. The project and exhibition was an exploration of mind, body and soul through a three-year collaborative study with Alan Dainton, a homeless beggar in Cheltenham battling addiction.

The project resulted in to major exhibitions at The Wilson Gallery and the H Club in London. Three large portraits of Alan were displayed as a triptych, with a supporting video that documented Alan’s journey. Visitors were invited to contemplate three images of Alan, each representing a different state of mind. They then had an opportunity to help Alan and others in similar situations by purchasing the supporting book, posters and postcards. The money spent was exchanged for the equivalent in gold plastic coins which were then used to vote on charitable options. Giving the money to:

Sustenation: Directly to Alan.
Intervention: One years rehabilitation for Alan or someone similar.
Prevention: Projects concerned with youth at risk or in recovery from drugs and alcohol.

The project received generous donations from the public while increasing awareness and interest around the topic of homelessness and addiction. Votes in the coin drop were overwhelmingly in favour of ‘Prevention’. This money was therefore donated to the local YMCA.

The book contains the thesis for the project as well as latest Home office figures on drugs and homelessness in the UK. The back page is embossed with Alan’s signature and cover unfolds to become a poster.

The high production values of the book deliberately juxtapose the subject. The aim is to make readers feel slightly uncomfortable that so much effort has been devoted to what most people would deem a hopeless case of addiction and disregard for society. The overarching idea for the book was to make something beautiful and significant out of the dirt and chaos of Alan’s world.

Two weeks after the exhibition, Alan decided to stay off Heroin and is now in sheltered accommodation in the Cheltenham YMCA. He is working on a recovery programme.

The high production values of the book deliberately juxtapose the subject. The aim is to make readers feel slightly uncomfortable that so much effort has been devoted to what most people would deem a hopeless case of addiction and disregard for society. The overarching idea for the book was to make something beautiful and significant out of the dirt and chaos of Alan’s world.

Two weeks after the exhibition, Alan decided to stay off Heroin and is now in sheltered accommodation in the Cheltenham YMCA. He is working on a recovery programme.

Alan Dainton – “If this project just helps one kid stay off drugs, it would still have been worth it.”

Behold the Man

‘Behold The Man’ was a self initiated 3 year social photographic documentary. The project and exhibition was an exploration of mind, body and soul through a three-year collaborative study with Alan Dainton, a homeless beggar in Cheltenham battling addiction.

The project resulted in to major exhibitions at The Wilson Gallery and the H Club in London. Three large portraits of Alan were displayed as a triptych, with a supporting video that documented Alan’s journey. Visitors were invited to contemplate three images of Alan, each representing a different state of mind. They then had an opportunity to help Alan and others in similar situations by purchasing the supporting book, posters and postcards. The money spent was exchanged for the equivalent in gold plastic coins which were then used to vote on charitable options. Giving the money to:

Sustenation: Directly to Alan.
Intervention: One years rehabilitation for Alan or someone similar.
Prevention: Projects concerned with youth at risk or in recovery from drugs and alcohol.

The project received generous donations from the public while increasing awareness and interest around the topic of homelessness and addiction. Votes in the coin drop were overwhelmingly in favour of ‘Prevention’. This money was therefore donated to the local YMCA.

The book contains the thesis for the project as well as latest Home office figures on drugs and homelessness in the UK. The back page is embossed with Alan’s signature and cover unfolds to become a poster.

The high production values of the book deliberately juxtapose the subject. The aim is to make readers feel slightly uncomfortable that so much effort has been devoted to what most people would deem a hopeless case of addiction and disregard for society. The overarching idea for the book was to make something beautiful and significant out of the dirt and chaos of Alan’s world.

Two weeks after the exhibition, Alan decided to stay off Heroin and is now in sheltered accommodation in the Cheltenham YMCA. He is working on a recovery programme.

The high production values of the book deliberately juxtapose the subject. The aim is to make readers feel slightly uncomfortable that so much effort has been devoted to what most people would deem a hopeless case of addiction and disregard for society. The overarching idea for the book was to make something beautiful and significant out of the dirt and chaos of Alan’s world.

Two weeks after the exhibition, Alan decided to stay off Heroin and is now in sheltered accommodation in the Cheltenham YMCA. He is working on a recovery programme.

Alan Dainton – “If this project just helps one kid stay off drugs, it would still have been worth it.”

Behold the Man

‘Behold The Man’ was a self initiated 3 year social photographic documentary. The project and exhibition was an exploration of mind, body and soul through a three-year collaborative study with Alan Dainton, a homeless beggar in Cheltenham battling addiction.

The project resulted in to major exhibitions at The Wilson Gallery and the H Club in London. Three large portraits of Alan were displayed as a triptych, with a supporting video that documented Alan’s journey. Visitors were invited to contemplate three images of Alan, each representing a different state of mind. They then had an opportunity to help Alan and others in similar situations by purchasing the supporting book, posters and postcards. The money spent was exchanged for the equivalent in gold plastic coins which were then used to vote on charitable options. Giving the money to:

Sustenation: Directly to Alan.
Intervention: One years rehabilitation for Alan or someone similar.
Prevention: Projects concerned with youth at risk or in recovery from drugs and alcohol.

The project received generous donations from the public while increasing awareness and interest around the topic of homelessness and addiction. Votes in the coin drop were overwhelmingly in favour of ‘Prevention’. This money was therefore donated to the local YMCA.

The book contains the thesis for the project as well as latest Home office figures on drugs and homelessness in the UK. The back page is embossed with Alan’s signature and cover unfolds to become a poster.

The high production values of the book deliberately juxtapose the subject. The aim is to make readers feel slightly uncomfortable that so much effort has been devoted to what most people would deem a hopeless case of addiction and disregard for society. The overarching idea for the book was to make something beautiful and significant out of the dirt and chaos of Alan’s world.

Two weeks after the exhibition, Alan decided to stay off Heroin and is now in sheltered accommodation in the Cheltenham YMCA. He is working on a recovery programme.

The high production values of the book deliberately juxtapose the subject. The aim is to make readers feel slightly uncomfortable that so much effort has been devoted to what most people would deem a hopeless case of addiction and disregard for society. The overarching idea for the book was to make something beautiful and significant out of the dirt and chaos of Alan’s world.

Two weeks after the exhibition, Alan decided to stay off Heroin and is now in sheltered accommodation in the Cheltenham YMCA. He is working on a recovery programme.

Alan Dainton – “If this project just helps one kid stay off drugs, it would still have been worth it.”

Behold the Man

‘Behold The Man’ was a self initiated 3 year social photographic documentary. The project and exhibition was an exploration of mind, body and soul through a three-year collaborative study with Alan Dainton, a homeless beggar in Cheltenham battling addiction.

The project resulted in to major exhibitions at The Wilson Gallery and the H Club in London. Three large portraits of Alan were displayed as a triptych, with a supporting video that documented Alan’s journey. Visitors were invited to contemplate three images of Alan, each representing a different state of mind. They then had an opportunity to help Alan and others in similar situations by purchasing the supporting book, posters and postcards. The money spent was exchanged for the equivalent in gold plastic coins which were then used to vote on charitable options. Giving the money to:

Sustenation: Directly to Alan.
Intervention: One years rehabilitation for Alan or someone similar.
Prevention: Projects concerned with youth at risk or in recovery from drugs and alcohol.

The project received generous donations from the public while increasing awareness and interest around the topic of homelessness and addiction. Votes in the coin drop were overwhelmingly in favour of ‘Prevention’. This money was therefore donated to the local YMCA.

The book contains the thesis for the project as well as latest Home office figures on drugs and homelessness in the UK. The back page is embossed with Alan’s signature and cover unfolds to become a poster.

The high production values of the book deliberately juxtapose the subject. The aim is to make readers feel slightly uncomfortable that so much effort has been devoted to what most people would deem a hopeless case of addiction and disregard for society. The overarching idea for the book was to make something beautiful and significant out of the dirt and chaos of Alan’s world.

Two weeks after the exhibition, Alan decided to stay off Heroin and is now in sheltered accommodation in the Cheltenham YMCA. He is working on a recovery programme.

The high production values of the book deliberately juxtapose the subject. The aim is to make readers feel slightly uncomfortable that so much effort has been devoted to what most people would deem a hopeless case of addiction and disregard for society. The overarching idea for the book was to make something beautiful and significant out of the dirt and chaos of Alan’s world.

Two weeks after the exhibition, Alan decided to stay off Heroin and is now in sheltered accommodation in the Cheltenham YMCA. He is working on a recovery programme.

Alan Dainton – “If this project just helps one kid stay off drugs, it would still have been worth it.”

Behold the Man

‘Behold The Man’ was a self initiated 3 year social photographic documentary. The project and exhibition was an exploration of mind, body and soul through a three-year collaborative study with Alan Dainton, a homeless beggar in Cheltenham battling addiction.

The project resulted in to major exhibitions at The Wilson Gallery and the H Club in London. Three large portraits of Alan were displayed as a triptych, with a supporting video that documented Alan’s journey. Visitors were invited to contemplate three images of Alan, each representing a different state of mind. They then had an opportunity to help Alan and others in similar situations by purchasing the supporting book, posters and postcards. The money spent was exchanged for the equivalent in gold plastic coins which were then used to vote on charitable options. Giving the money to:

Sustenation: Directly to Alan.
Intervention: One years rehabilitation for Alan or someone similar.
Prevention: Projects concerned with youth at risk or in recovery from drugs and alcohol.

The project received generous donations from the public while increasing awareness and interest around the topic of homelessness and addiction. Votes in the coin drop were overwhelmingly in favour of ‘Prevention’. This money was therefore donated to the local YMCA.

The book contains the thesis for the project as well as latest Home office figures on drugs and homelessness in the UK. The back page is embossed with Alan’s signature and cover unfolds to become a poster.

The high production values of the book deliberately juxtapose the subject. The aim is to make readers feel slightly uncomfortable that so much effort has been devoted to what most people would deem a hopeless case of addiction and disregard for society. The overarching idea for the book was to make something beautiful and significant out of the dirt and chaos of Alan’s world.

Two weeks after the exhibition, Alan decided to stay off Heroin and is now in sheltered accommodation in the Cheltenham YMCA. He is working on a recovery programme.

The high production values of the book deliberately juxtapose the subject. The aim is to make readers feel slightly uncomfortable that so much effort has been devoted to what most people would deem a hopeless case of addiction and disregard for society. The overarching idea for the book was to make something beautiful and significant out of the dirt and chaos of Alan’s world.

Two weeks after the exhibition, Alan decided to stay off Heroin and is now in sheltered accommodation in the Cheltenham YMCA. He is working on a recovery programme.

Alan Dainton – “If this project just helps one kid stay off drugs, it would still have been worth it.”

Behold the Man

‘Behold The Man’ was a self initiated 3 year social photographic documentary. The project and exhibition was an exploration of mind, body and soul through a three-year collaborative study with Alan Dainton, a homeless beggar in Cheltenham battling addiction.

The project resulted in to major exhibitions at The Wilson Gallery and the H Club in London. Three large portraits of Alan were displayed as a triptych, with a supporting video that documented Alan’s journey. Visitors were invited to contemplate three images of Alan, each representing a different state of mind. They then had an opportunity to help Alan and others in similar situations by purchasing the supporting book, posters and postcards. The money spent was exchanged for the equivalent in gold plastic coins which were then used to vote on charitable options. Giving the money to:

Sustenation: Directly to Alan.
Intervention: One years rehabilitation for Alan or someone similar.
Prevention: Projects concerned with youth at risk or in recovery from drugs and alcohol.

The project received generous donations from the public while increasing awareness and interest around the topic of homelessness and addiction. Votes in the coin drop were overwhelmingly in favour of ‘Prevention’. This money was therefore donated to the local YMCA.

The book contains the thesis for the project as well as latest Home office figures on drugs and homelessness in the UK. The back page is embossed with Alan’s signature and cover unfolds to become a poster.

The high production values of the book deliberately juxtapose the subject. The aim is to make readers feel slightly uncomfortable that so much effort has been devoted to what most people would deem a hopeless case of addiction and disregard for society. The overarching idea for the book was to make something beautiful and significant out of the dirt and chaos of Alan’s world.

Two weeks after the exhibition, Alan decided to stay off Heroin and is now in sheltered accommodation in the Cheltenham YMCA. He is working on a recovery programme.

The high production values of the book deliberately juxtapose the subject. The aim is to make readers feel slightly uncomfortable that so much effort has been devoted to what most people would deem a hopeless case of addiction and disregard for society. The overarching idea for the book was to make something beautiful and significant out of the dirt and chaos of Alan’s world.

Two weeks after the exhibition, Alan decided to stay off Heroin and is now in sheltered accommodation in the Cheltenham YMCA. He is working on a recovery programme.

Alan Dainton – “If this project just helps one kid stay off drugs, it would still have been worth it.”

Behold the Man

‘Behold The Man’ was a self initiated 3 year social photographic documentary. The project and exhibition was an exploration of mind, body and soul through a three-year collaborative study with Alan Dainton, a homeless beggar in Cheltenham battling addiction.

The project resulted in to major exhibitions at The Wilson Gallery and the H Club in London. Three large portraits of Alan were displayed as a triptych, with a supporting video that documented Alan’s journey. Visitors were invited to contemplate three images of Alan, each representing a different state of mind. They then had an opportunity to help Alan and others in similar situations by purchasing the supporting book, posters and postcards. The money spent was exchanged for the equivalent in gold plastic coins which were then used to vote on charitable options. Giving the money to:

Sustenation: Directly to Alan.
Intervention: One years rehabilitation for Alan or someone similar.
Prevention: Projects concerned with youth at risk or in recovery from drugs and alcohol.

The project received generous donations from the public while increasing awareness and interest around the topic of homelessness and addiction. Votes in the coin drop were overwhelmingly in favour of ‘Prevention’. This money was therefore donated to the local YMCA.

The book contains the thesis for the project as well as latest Home office figures on drugs and homelessness in the UK. The back page is embossed with Alan’s signature and cover unfolds to become a poster.

The high production values of the book deliberately juxtapose the subject. The aim is to make readers feel slightly uncomfortable that so much effort has been devoted to what most people would deem a hopeless case of addiction and disregard for society. The overarching idea for the book was to make something beautiful and significant out of the dirt and chaos of Alan’s world.

Two weeks after the exhibition, Alan decided to stay off Heroin and is now in sheltered accommodation in the Cheltenham YMCA. He is working on a recovery programme.

The high production values of the book deliberately juxtapose the subject. The aim is to make readers feel slightly uncomfortable that so much effort has been devoted to what most people would deem a hopeless case of addiction and disregard for society. The overarching idea for the book was to make something beautiful and significant out of the dirt and chaos of Alan’s world.

Two weeks after the exhibition, Alan decided to stay off Heroin and is now in sheltered accommodation in the Cheltenham YMCA. He is working on a recovery programme.

Alan Dainton – “If this project just helps one kid stay off drugs, it would still have been worth it.”

Behold the Man

‘Behold The Man’ was a self initiated 3 year social photographic documentary. The project and exhibition was an exploration of mind, body and soul through a three-year collaborative study with Alan Dainton, a homeless beggar in Cheltenham battling addiction.

The project resulted in to major exhibitions at The Wilson Gallery and the H Club in London. Three large portraits of Alan were displayed as a triptych, with a supporting video that documented Alan’s journey. Visitors were invited to contemplate three images of Alan, each representing a different state of mind. They then had an opportunity to help Alan and others in similar situations by purchasing the supporting book, posters and postcards. The money spent was exchanged for the equivalent in gold plastic coins which were then used to vote on charitable options. Giving the money to:

Sustenation: Directly to Alan.
Intervention: One years rehabilitation for Alan or someone similar.
Prevention: Projects concerned with youth at risk or in recovery from drugs and alcohol.

The project received generous donations from the public while increasing awareness and interest around the topic of homelessness and addiction. Votes in the coin drop were overwhelmingly in favour of ‘Prevention’. This money was therefore donated to the local YMCA.

The book contains the thesis for the project as well as latest Home office figures on drugs and homelessness in the UK. The back page is embossed with Alan’s signature and cover unfolds to become a poster.

The high production values of the book deliberately juxtapose the subject. The aim is to make readers feel slightly uncomfortable that so much effort has been devoted to what most people would deem a hopeless case of addiction and disregard for society. The overarching idea for the book was to make something beautiful and significant out of the dirt and chaos of Alan’s world.

Two weeks after the exhibition, Alan decided to stay off Heroin and is now in sheltered accommodation in the Cheltenham YMCA. He is working on a recovery programme.

The high production values of the book deliberately juxtapose the subject. The aim is to make readers feel slightly uncomfortable that so much effort has been devoted to what most people would deem a hopeless case of addiction and disregard for society. The overarching idea for the book was to make something beautiful and significant out of the dirt and chaos of Alan’s world.

Two weeks after the exhibition, Alan decided to stay off Heroin and is now in sheltered accommodation in the Cheltenham YMCA. He is working on a recovery programme.

Alan Dainton – “If this project just helps one kid stay off drugs, it would still have been worth it.”

Behold the Man

‘Behold The Man’ was a self initiated 3 year social photographic documentary. The project and exhibition was an exploration of mind, body and soul through a three-year collaborative study with Alan Dainton, a homeless beggar in Cheltenham battling addiction.

The project resulted in to major exhibitions at The Wilson Gallery and the H Club in London. Three large portraits of Alan were displayed as a triptych, with a supporting video that documented Alan’s journey. Visitors were invited to contemplate three images of Alan, each representing a different state of mind. They then had an opportunity to help Alan and others in similar situations by purchasing the supporting book, posters and postcards. The money spent was exchanged for the equivalent in gold plastic coins which were then used to vote on charitable options. Giving the money to:

Sustenation: Directly to Alan.
Intervention: One years rehabilitation for Alan or someone similar.
Prevention: Projects concerned with youth at risk or in recovery from drugs and alcohol.

The project received generous donations from the public while increasing awareness and interest around the topic of homelessness and addiction. Votes in the coin drop were overwhelmingly in favour of ‘Prevention’. This money was therefore donated to the local YMCA.

The book contains the thesis for the project as well as latest Home office figures on drugs and homelessness in the UK. The back page is embossed with Alan’s signature and cover unfolds to become a poster.

The high production values of the book deliberately juxtapose the subject. The aim is to make readers feel slightly uncomfortable that so much effort has been devoted to what most people would deem a hopeless case of addiction and disregard for society. The overarching idea for the book was to make something beautiful and significant out of the dirt and chaos of Alan’s world.

Two weeks after the exhibition, Alan decided to stay off Heroin and is now in sheltered accommodation in the Cheltenham YMCA. He is working on a recovery programme.

The high production values of the book deliberately juxtapose the subject. The aim is to make readers feel slightly uncomfortable that so much effort has been devoted to what most people would deem a hopeless case of addiction and disregard for society. The overarching idea for the book was to make something beautiful and significant out of the dirt and chaos of Alan’s world.

Two weeks after the exhibition, Alan decided to stay off Heroin and is now in sheltered accommodation in the Cheltenham YMCA. He is working on a recovery programme.

Alan Dainton – “If this project just helps one kid stay off drugs, it would still have been worth it.”

Behold the Man

‘Behold The Man’ was a self initiated 3 year social photographic documentary. The project and exhibition was an exploration of mind, body and soul through a three-year collaborative study with Alan Dainton, a homeless beggar in Cheltenham battling addiction.

The project resulted in to major exhibitions at The Wilson Gallery and the H Club in London. Three large portraits of Alan were displayed as a triptych, with a supporting video that documented Alan’s journey. Visitors were invited to contemplate three images of Alan, each representing a different state of mind. They then had an opportunity to help Alan and others in similar situations by purchasing the supporting book, posters and postcards. The money spent was exchanged for the equivalent in gold plastic coins which were then used to vote on charitable options. Giving the money to:

Sustenation: Directly to Alan.
Intervention: One years rehabilitation for Alan or someone similar.
Prevention: Projects concerned with youth at risk or in recovery from drugs and alcohol.

The project received generous donations from the public while increasing awareness and interest around the topic of homelessness and addiction. Votes in the coin drop were overwhelmingly in favour of ‘Prevention’. This money was therefore donated to the local YMCA.

The book contains the thesis for the project as well as latest Home office figures on drugs and homelessness in the UK. The back page is embossed with Alan’s signature and cover unfolds to become a poster.

The high production values of the book deliberately juxtapose the subject. The aim is to make readers feel slightly uncomfortable that so much effort has been devoted to what most people would deem a hopeless case of addiction and disregard for society. The overarching idea for the book was to make something beautiful and significant out of the dirt and chaos of Alan’s world.

Two weeks after the exhibition, Alan decided to stay off Heroin and is now in sheltered accommodation in the Cheltenham YMCA. He is working on a recovery programme.

The high production values of the book deliberately juxtapose the subject. The aim is to make readers feel slightly uncomfortable that so much effort has been devoted to what most people would deem a hopeless case of addiction and disregard for society. The overarching idea for the book was to make something beautiful and significant out of the dirt and chaos of Alan’s world.

Two weeks after the exhibition, Alan decided to stay off Heroin and is now in sheltered accommodation in the Cheltenham YMCA. He is working on a recovery programme.

Alan Dainton – “If this project just helps one kid stay off drugs, it would still have been worth it.”

Behold the Man

‘Behold The Man’ was a self initiated 3 year social photographic documentary. The project and exhibition was an exploration of mind, body and soul through a three-year collaborative study with Alan Dainton, a homeless beggar in Cheltenham battling addiction.

The project resulted in to major exhibitions at The Wilson Gallery and the H Club in London. Three large portraits of Alan were displayed as a triptych, with a supporting video that documented Alan’s journey. Visitors were invited to contemplate three images of Alan, each representing a different state of mind. They then had an opportunity to help Alan and others in similar situations by purchasing the supporting book, posters and postcards. The money spent was exchanged for the equivalent in gold plastic coins which were then used to vote on charitable options. Giving the money to:

Sustenation: Directly to Alan.
Intervention: One years rehabilitation for Alan or someone similar.
Prevention: Projects concerned with youth at risk or in recovery from drugs and alcohol.

The project received generous donations from the public while increasing awareness and interest around the topic of homelessness and addiction. Votes in the coin drop were overwhelmingly in favour of ‘Prevention’. This money was therefore donated to the local YMCA.

The book contains the thesis for the project as well as latest Home office figures on drugs and homelessness in the UK. The back page is embossed with Alan’s signature and cover unfolds to become a poster.

The high production values of the book deliberately juxtapose the subject. The aim is to make readers feel slightly uncomfortable that so much effort has been devoted to what most people would deem a hopeless case of addiction and disregard for society. The overarching idea for the book was to make something beautiful and significant out of the dirt and chaos of Alan’s world.

Two weeks after the exhibition, Alan decided to stay off Heroin and is now in sheltered accommodation in the Cheltenham YMCA. He is working on a recovery programme.

The high production values of the book deliberately juxtapose the subject. The aim is to make readers feel slightly uncomfortable that so much effort has been devoted to what most people would deem a hopeless case of addiction and disregard for society. The overarching idea for the book was to make something beautiful and significant out of the dirt and chaos of Alan’s world.

Two weeks after the exhibition, Alan decided to stay off Heroin and is now in sheltered accommodation in the Cheltenham YMCA. He is working on a recovery programme.

Alan Dainton – “If this project just helps one kid stay off drugs, it would still have been worth it.”

Behold the Man

‘Behold The Man’ was a self initiated 3 year social photographic documentary. The project and exhibition was an exploration of mind, body and soul through a three-year collaborative study with Alan Dainton, a homeless beggar in Cheltenham battling addiction.

The project resulted in to major exhibitions at The Wilson Gallery and the H Club in London. Three large portraits of Alan were displayed as a triptych, with a supporting video that documented Alan’s journey. Visitors were invited to contemplate three images of Alan, each representing a different state of mind. They then had an opportunity to help Alan and others in similar situations by purchasing the supporting book, posters and postcards. The money spent was exchanged for the equivalent in gold plastic coins which were then used to vote on charitable options. Giving the money to:

Sustenation: Directly to Alan.
Intervention: One years rehabilitation for Alan or someone similar.
Prevention: Projects concerned with youth at risk or in recovery from drugs and alcohol.

The project received generous donations from the public while increasing awareness and interest around the topic of homelessness and addiction. Votes in the coin drop were overwhelmingly in favour of ‘Prevention’. This money was therefore donated to the local YMCA.

The book contains the thesis for the project as well as latest Home office figures on drugs and homelessness in the UK. The back page is embossed with Alan’s signature and cover unfolds to become a poster.

The high production values of the book deliberately juxtapose the subject. The aim is to make readers feel slightly uncomfortable that so much effort has been devoted to what most people would deem a hopeless case of addiction and disregard for society. The overarching idea for the book was to make something beautiful and significant out of the dirt and chaos of Alan’s world.

Two weeks after the exhibition, Alan decided to stay off Heroin and is now in sheltered accommodation in the Cheltenham YMCA. He is working on a recovery programme.

The high production values of the book deliberately juxtapose the subject. The aim is to make readers feel slightly uncomfortable that so much effort has been devoted to what most people would deem a hopeless case of addiction and disregard for society. The overarching idea for the book was to make something beautiful and significant out of the dirt and chaos of Alan’s world.

Two weeks after the exhibition, Alan decided to stay off Heroin and is now in sheltered accommodation in the Cheltenham YMCA. He is working on a recovery programme.

Alan Dainton – “If this project just helps one kid stay off drugs, it would still have been worth it.”

Behold the Man

‘Behold The Man’ was a self initiated 3 year social photographic documentary. The project and exhibition was an exploration of mind, body and soul through a three-year collaborative study with Alan Dainton, a homeless beggar in Cheltenham battling addiction.

The project resulted in to major exhibitions at The Wilson Gallery and the H Club in London. Three large portraits of Alan were displayed as a triptych, with a supporting video that documented Alan’s journey. Visitors were invited to contemplate three images of Alan, each representing a different state of mind. They then had an opportunity to help Alan and others in similar situations by purchasing the supporting book, posters and postcards. The money spent was exchanged for the equivalent in gold plastic coins which were then used to vote on charitable options. Giving the money to:

Sustenation: Directly to Alan.
Intervention: One years rehabilitation for Alan or someone similar.
Prevention: Projects concerned with youth at risk or in recovery from drugs and alcohol.

The project received generous donations from the public while increasing awareness and interest around the topic of homelessness and addiction. Votes in the coin drop were overwhelmingly in favour of ‘Prevention’. This money was therefore donated to the local YMCA.

The book contains the thesis for the project as well as latest Home office figures on drugs and homelessness in the UK. The back page is embossed with Alan’s signature and cover unfolds to become a poster.

The high production values of the book deliberately juxtapose the subject. The aim is to make readers feel slightly uncomfortable that so much effort has been devoted to what most people would deem a hopeless case of addiction and disregard for society. The overarching idea for the book was to make something beautiful and significant out of the dirt and chaos of Alan’s world.

Two weeks after the exhibition, Alan decided to stay off Heroin and is now in sheltered accommodation in the Cheltenham YMCA. He is working on a recovery programme.

The high production values of the book deliberately juxtapose the subject. The aim is to make readers feel slightly uncomfortable that so much effort has been devoted to what most people would deem a hopeless case of addiction and disregard for society. The overarching idea for the book was to make something beautiful and significant out of the dirt and chaos of Alan’s world.

Two weeks after the exhibition, Alan decided to stay off Heroin and is now in sheltered accommodation in the Cheltenham YMCA. He is working on a recovery programme.

Alan Dainton – “If this project just helps one kid stay off drugs, it would still have been worth it.”

Behold the Man

‘Behold The Man’ was a self initiated 3 year social photographic documentary. The project and exhibition was an exploration of mind, body and soul through a three-year collaborative study with Alan Dainton, a homeless beggar in Cheltenham battling addiction.

The project resulted in to major exhibitions at The Wilson Gallery and the H Club in London. Three large portraits of Alan were displayed as a triptych, with a supporting video that documented Alan’s journey. Visitors were invited to contemplate three images of Alan, each representing a different state of mind. They then had an opportunity to help Alan and others in similar situations by purchasing the supporting book, posters and postcards. The money spent was exchanged for the equivalent in gold plastic coins which were then used to vote on charitable options. Giving the money to:

Sustenation: Directly to Alan.
Intervention: One years rehabilitation for Alan or someone similar.
Prevention: Projects concerned with youth at risk or in recovery from drugs and alcohol.

The project received generous donations from the public while increasing awareness and interest around the topic of homelessness and addiction. Votes in the coin drop were overwhelmingly in favour of ‘Prevention’. This money was therefore donated to the local YMCA.

The book contains the thesis for the project as well as latest Home office figures on drugs and homelessness in the UK. The back page is embossed with Alan’s signature and cover unfolds to become a poster.

The high production values of the book deliberately juxtapose the subject. The aim is to make readers feel slightly uncomfortable that so much effort has been devoted to what most people would deem a hopeless case of addiction and disregard for society. The overarching idea for the book was to make something beautiful and significant out of the dirt and chaos of Alan’s world.

Two weeks after the exhibition, Alan decided to stay off Heroin and is now in sheltered accommodation in the Cheltenham YMCA. He is working on a recovery programme.

The high production values of the book deliberately juxtapose the subject. The aim is to make readers feel slightly uncomfortable that so much effort has been devoted to what most people would deem a hopeless case of addiction and disregard for society. The overarching idea for the book was to make something beautiful and significant out of the dirt and chaos of Alan’s world.

Two weeks after the exhibition, Alan decided to stay off Heroin and is now in sheltered accommodation in the Cheltenham YMCA. He is working on a recovery programme.

Alan Dainton – “If this project just helps one kid stay off drugs, it would still have been worth it.”